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Gallery Talk: Photographs of 1950s Cape Town: The Bryan Heseltine Collection

Event Details

Gallery Talk: Photographs of 1950s Cape Town: The Bryan Heseltine Collection

Time: November 19, 2011 from 2:30pm to 3pm
Location: PITT RIVERS MUSEUM
Street: SOUTH PARKS ROAD
City/Town: OXFORD, OX1 3PP
Website or Map: http://www.prm.ox.ac.uk/
Event Type: talk
Organized By: PITT RIVERS MUSEUM
Latest Activity: Sep 5, 2011

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Event Description

Darren Newbury, Professor of Photography at Birmingham City University, will give a talk on an extraordinary collection of images from 1950s Cape Town by the photographer Bryan Heseltine, a selection of which are currently on show in the exhibition People Apart: Cape Town Survey 1952. The carefully composed images provide a rich and intimate description of social and cultural life in a number of townships and areas of the city, including the work of street craftsmen, beer brewing, music and dance. They illustrate the diversity of Cape Town’s inhabitants, the mix of established town dwellers and those recent arrivals making the transition between country and city. The talk will introduce this little-known body of work, discussing the motivations behind the creation of the photographs, their first exhibition in Cape Town and how they came to be shown in London in the mid 1950s. It will also reflect on the recent coming to light of the collection and its interpretation for the present. Professor Newbury has spent a number of years researching photography in apartheid South Africa and the re-use of historical images as a form of memorialisation in post-apartheid museum displays.

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