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Greetings all

Would anyone know of any other colonial daguerreotype license granted by Richard Beard - other than to George B Goodman from London, who was the first commercial daguerreotypist to set up shop in Australia in Sydney in December 1842.

Goodman's license apparently included India and he implied he was going there. It is surpising that India was not the first destination for a licensee, given the likelihood of business there from all the British stationed in the sub continent.

Gael Newton

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Interesting... I understood that Beard's agreement with Daguerre only gave him rights for England and Wales. Certainly the Miles Berry's patent was only applicable to England and Wales as Ireland Scotland had their own patent systems.
Michael Pritchard said:
Interesting... I understood that Beard's agreement with Daguerre only gave him rights for England and Wales. Certainly the Miles Berry's patent was only applicable to England and Wales as Ireland Scotland had their own patent systems.
Dear Michael

I have seen both England' and all her colonies' and England 'and all her colonies and plantations' cited by others as direct quotes. I shall go in search of the exact citations.

Michael Pritchard said:
Interesting... I understood that Beard's agreement with Daguerre only gave him rights for England and Wales. Certainly the Miles Berry's patent was only applicable to England and Wales as Ireland Scotland had their own patent systems.
Gael Newton said:
Dear Michael

I have seen both England' and all her colonies' and England 'and all her colonies and plantations' cited by others as direct quotes. I shall go in search of the exact citations.

Michael Pritchard said:
Interesting... I understood that Beard's agreement with Daguerre only gave him rights for England and Wales. Certainly the Miles Berry's patent was only applicable to England and Wales as Ireland Scotland had their own patent systems.
Hello,

‘Specification of Miles Berry Obtaining Daguerreotype Portraits, &c. No 8194 AD 1839’ which states ‘the term of years therein mentioned, should and lawfully might make, use, exercise, and vend, within England, Wales, and the Town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, and in all Her Majesty’s Colonies and Plantations abroad, an Invention of “A New or Improved .... ”'.

‘Specification of Richard Beard Apparatus for Obtaining Likenesses, &c. No 8546 AD 1840’ which states ‘the term of years therein expressed, should and lawfully might make, use, exercise, and vend, within England, Wales, and the Town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, the Invention of “Improvements in ....”'.

With Beard acquiring the rights to the daguerreotype patent from Miles Berry he would have control of the process in the areas covered by the patent. In applying for a patent the prospective patentee could specify the area it covered, so including ‘Her Majesty’s Colonies and Plantations abroad’ would have incurred extra costs.

Bob
Dear Bob,

Thank you for that information; are you saying that Beard DID NOT buy the provision to cover 'Her Majesty's colonies and plantations' as part of his purchase from Miles Berry?

Beard advertised colonial licenses in 'The Times' 18 April 1842, and Goodman stated in Australia in 1843 he had a license which included the rights to operate in India. He challenged both local upstart competitors like Tasmanian painter Thomas Bock and C.and J. Trood who came to Sydney as daguerreotypists from Claudet's Adelaide Gallery in December 1843, having worked in Ireland - which was also had no patent restrictions.
regards

Gael




Bob Pullen said:
Hello,

‘Specification of Miles Berry Obtaining Daguerreotype Portraits, &c. No 8194 AD 1839’ which states ‘the term of years therein mentioned, should and lawfully might make, use, exercise, and vend, within England, Wales, and the Town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, and in all Her Majesty’s Colonies and Plantations abroad, an Invention of “A New or Improved .... ”'.

‘Specification of Richard Beard Apparatus for Obtaining Likenesses, &c. No 8546 AD 1840’ which states ‘the term of years therein expressed, should and lawfully might make, use, exercise, and vend, within England, Wales, and the Town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, the Invention of “Improvements in ....”'.

With Beard acquiring the rights to the daguerreotype patent from Miles Berry he would have control of the process in the areas covered by the patent. In applying for a patent the prospective patentee could specify the area it covered, so including ‘Her Majesty’s Colonies and Plantations abroad’ would have incurred extra costs.

Bob
Hi Gael,

I have been doing a lot of research recently on Beard's Scottish and Irish Patents - the results are published in the latest Daguerreian Annual - and I have to tell you Beard did patent his 'Improvements' in both Ireland and Scotland. This probably means that the Scots and Irish were free to use Daguerre's original specification, but not Beard's 'Improvements'. There is, however, no record of beard ever enforcing his patents, so one is left wondering why on earth he went to the time and expense of protecting his invention. The relevant documents are Scottish Patent 144 of December 2nd 1840 (National Archives of Scotland, document number C20-40-144) This is, in fact, an earlier version of Beard’s English Patent No.8546 granted ten days later on December 12th º reflecting the much smaller workload of the Scottish Patent Office which meant they processed it more quickly. The other two are Scottish Patent No.148, 1841 (National Archives of Scotland, document number C20-41-148) and Irish Patent No.229 1840, exact date uncertain, but around the same time as the 1840 Scottish and English patents, and presumably covering the same 'Improvements'. The original document was lost in a fire in 1922.

John

Gael Newton said:
Dear Bob,

Thank you for that information; are you saying that Beard DID NOT buy the provision to cover 'Her Majesty's colonies and plantations' as part of his purchase from Miles Berry?

Beard advertised colonial licenses in 'The Times' 18 April 1842, and Goodman stated in Australia in 1843 he had a license which included the rights to operate in India. He challenged both local upstart competitors like Tasmanian painter Thomas Bock and C.and J. Trood who came to Sydney as daguerreotypists from Claudet's Adelaide Gallery in December 1843, having worked in Ireland - which was also had no patent restrictions.
regards

Gael




Bob Pullen said:
Hello,

‘Specification of Miles Berry Obtaining Daguerreotype Portraits, &c. No 8194 AD 1839’ which states ‘the term of years therein mentioned, should and lawfully might make, use, exercise, and vend, within England, Wales, and the Town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, and in all Her Majesty’s Colonies and Plantations abroad, an Invention of “A New or Improved .... ”'.

‘Specification of Richard Beard Apparatus for Obtaining Likenesses, &c. No 8546 AD 1840’ which states ‘the term of years therein expressed, should and lawfully might make, use, exercise, and vend, within England, Wales, and the Town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, the Invention of “Improvements in ....”'.

With Beard acquiring the rights to the daguerreotype patent from Miles Berry he would have control of the process in the areas covered by the patent. In applying for a patent the prospective patentee could specify the area it covered, so including ‘Her Majesty’s Colonies and Plantations abroad’ would have incurred extra costs.

Bob

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