British photographic history

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Is there anyone in the U.K.who is willing to do a workshop demonstrating the carbon process. This to be part of a proposed exhibition, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Joseph Swans death. This to take place at the Newcastle Literary and Philosophical Society, where Joseph Swan was President.
Please contact Paul Cordes at enquiries@classicphotographics.co.uk.
Full details will be posted in due course.
Any other information or items relating to Swan or Mawson and Swan would be greatly appreciated.

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Have you looked at the St Brides Print Museum off Fleet street? I know that they have some of the Autotype archives and if I remember correctly there was some correspondence that may be useful. I would be very interested to learn more about what your work.

Hello Janine,
Thanks for your reply. I will be visiting London soon and hope to make a visit to the print Museum.
We are planning an exhibition in memory of Joseph Swan, he made great advances in perfecting carbon printing.
Ideally, we would like to find a practitioner who could demonstrate the process, but carbon printing is not as popular or fashionable as say, wet collodian.
Having said that, it is a very beautiful and stable form of photographic printing.
I have a copy of the On The Production of Photographs in Pigments. Swan's Process from 1867. This has an original carbon print included which looks as good as the day it was produced, with fantastic tonal range.
This is were Swan achieved success, as other people working on this technique could not get the mid tones, so prints were too contrasty.

I would be really fascinated to see the copy  On The Production of Photographs in Pigments. Swan's Process from 1867. It is a bit early for my present research but extremely relevant non the less as I am looking at colour in the 1920s. 

Good luck with your trip to London

Paul Cordes said:

Hello Janine,
Thanks for your reply. I will be visiting London soon and hope to make a visit to the print Museum.
We are planning an exhibition in memory of Joseph Swan, he made great advances in perfecting carbon printing.
Ideally, we would like to find a practitioner who could demonstrate the process, but carbon printing is not as popular or fashionable as say, wet collodian.
Having said that, it is a very beautiful and stable form of photographic printing.
I have a copy of the On The Production of Photographs in Pigments. Swan's Process from 1867. This has an original carbon print included which looks as good as the day it was produced, with fantastic tonal range.
This is were Swan achieved success, as other people working on this technique could not get the mid tones, so prints were too contrasty.

The Swan book is the property of the Literary and Philosophical Society Library. I could send some images if that is a help.

Does your research involve Autochrome and the 3 colour process?



Janine P Freeston said:

I would be really fascinated to see the copy  On The Production of Photographs in Pigments. Swan's Process from 1867. It is a bit early for my present research but extremely relevant non the less as I am looking at colour in the 1920s. 

Good luck with your trip to London

Paul Cordes said:

Hello Janine,
Thanks for your reply. I will be visiting London soon and hope to make a visit to the print Museum.
We are planning an exhibition in memory of Joseph Swan, he made great advances in perfecting carbon printing.
Ideally, we would like to find a practitioner who could demonstrate the process, but carbon printing is not as popular or fashionable as say, wet collodian.
Having said that, it is a very beautiful and stable form of photographic printing.
I have a copy of the On The Production of Photographs in Pigments. Swan's Process from 1867. This has an original carbon print included which looks as good as the day it was produced, with fantastic tonal range.
This is were Swan achieved success, as other people working on this technique could not get the mid tones, so prints were too contrasty.

If you look on Terry Kings webpage,you will see he is running a Carbon Process workshop in May at his studio in Richmond.

Hello Brian,

Many thanks, I have contacted Mr. King and await a reply.

BRIAN IDDON said:

If you look on Terry Kings webpage,you will see he is running a Carbon Process workshop in May at his studio in Richmond.

Yes and Yes please!

Paul Cordes said:

The Swan book is the property of the Literary and Philosophical Society Library. I could send some images if that is a help.

Does your research involve Autochrome and the 3 colour process?



Janine P Freeston said:

I would be really fascinated to see the copy  On The Production of Photographs in Pigments. Swan's Process from 1867. It is a bit early for my present research but extremely relevant non the less as I am looking at colour in the 1920s. 

Good luck with your trip to London

Paul Cordes said:

Hello Janine,
Thanks for your reply. I will be visiting London soon and hope to make a visit to the print Museum.
We are planning an exhibition in memory of Joseph Swan, he made great advances in perfecting carbon printing.
Ideally, we would like to find a practitioner who could demonstrate the process, but carbon printing is not as popular or fashionable as say, wet collodian.
Having said that, it is a very beautiful and stable form of photographic printing.
I have a copy of the On The Production of Photographs in Pigments. Swan's Process from 1867. This has an original carbon print included which looks as good as the day it was produced, with fantastic tonal range.
This is were Swan achieved success, as other people working on this technique could not get the mid tones, so prints were too contrasty.

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