British photographic history

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After the US entered World War I, at least some commercial photographers donated used glass plate negatives for use in gas masks and aviation goggles.  Did this also occur in England?  Is there a contemporary source?

 

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Dear Barbara, from my research of the family of John Burton & Sons of Leicester and Nottingham etc. established around 1861, it was sad to discover how few glass plates of this fairly prolific company had survived over several generations. In particular, because their rare large format prints of images from the 1870 on were of a high quality and historically valuable, it was depressing to not find any cache of their negatives. Their company continued under the youngest sons up until at least WWII, but I could find no trace of their negatives. My interest, as a New Zealand photo historian came about due to my now 50 years study of the work of Alfred H Burton and his younger brother, Walter James Burton, who worked in Dunedin, NZ from arond 1868-1898 when Alfred retired. It seems most likely, for whatever reason, that their English negatives would have been recycled. Sorry I have no proof of their demise - and - now living in China my primary research notes are in storage in Auckland. Quite a lot has been written about the NZ Burton Bros but little about the English business. you might like to try my small portfolio of the NZ work at  www.photoforum-nz.org.

Wishing you all the best with your research.

Kind Regards, John Turner

Thank you very much for your response.  It is hard to determine why glass plate negatives are missing (fragility or war-time policy).  The ability of portrait studios to maintain negatives and reproduce from them was a major selling point, especially for firms focusing on actors.  

I will make sure that I check out your web site,

regards from NY,

Barbara Stratyner

John B Turner said:

Dear Barbara, from my research of the family of John Burton & Sons of Leicester and Nottingham etc. established around 1861, it was sad to discover how few glass plates of this fairly prolific company had survived over several generations. In particular, because their rare large format prints of images from the 1870 on were of a high quality and historically valuable, it was depressing to not find any cache of their negatives. Their company continued under the youngest sons up until at least WWII, but I could find no trace of their negatives. My interest, as a New Zealand photo historian came about due to my now 50 years study of the work of Alfred H Burton and his younger brother, Walter James Burton, who worked in Dunedin, NZ from arond 1868-1898 when Alfred retired. It seems most likely, for whatever reason, that their English negatives would have been recycled. Sorry I have no proof of their demise - and - now living in China my primary research notes are in storage in Auckland. Quite a lot has been written about the NZ Burton Bros but little about the English business. you might like to try my small portfolio of the NZ work at  www.photoforum-nz.org.

Wishing you all the best with your research.

Kind Regards, John Turner

Thanks, and good luck. I'll try to find something more definite, one way or another,

John

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