British photographic history

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Exhibition: 'Into the Woods: Trees in Photography' / London, Victoria and Albert Museum, until 22 April 2018

I grew up on a farm for the first thirteen years of my life. I played in the fields and forests of England, and wandered the cart paths with my brother. I saw him for the first time in thirty years last August, after the passing of my father. We went back and walked those very same paths where we grew up and looked at the magnificent trees planted along the edge of the fields. After all that had happened, it was an emotional and healing journey for both of us...

The innocence of being a child growing up on the land returned, the innocence of something that is never really forgotten. I still am a country boy at heart; I still love the land and the trees. I always will.

It's a pity then, that this seems to be just a "filler" exhibition from the V&A. No press release, two sentences on the website and no information about the images such as details of process etc... I had to dig into the collection to find the information you read here, including the text descriptions beneath the images. For such a magical and mythical subject that has fascinated human beings since the beginning of time, you might have expected a more in depth investigation.

As an addendum I have included my favourite tree images. You will have your own. The last image in particular has that element of threat and wonder that makes the forest such a rich, fluid and evocative space.

Dr Marcus Bunyan for Art Blart

SEE THE FULL POSTING AT https://wp.me/pn2J2-a2d

Image:
Gustave Le Gray
In the Forest of Fontainbleau (Bas-Bréau)
1852
Gold-toned albumen print from waxed paper negative
Chauncey Hare Townshend Bequest 1868

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Comment by Jonathan Dore on April 2, 2018 at 10:59

This was a fantastic little exhibition, but I agree that it was strangely hard to find in the museum. If I hadn't written down the room number before going I wouldn't have been able to find it, since no one at the information desk seemed to have heard of it.

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