British photographic history

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Photographing the City builds on the
success
of
the
2009
Visual
Literacy
Series
–
Staging,
Manipulation
and
Photographic
Truth. This
year
there
will
be
two
major
events
based
on
Photography
and
the
City.

Andy
Golding
and
Eileen
Perrier
will
focus
on
how
to
think
through
the
production
of
photographic
projects,
how
to

contextualise
the
city,
its
development
and
inhabitants
and
consider
ways
in
which
the
city
and
its
social

conditions,
(housing,
work,
poverty,
war),
cultural
trends
(music,
film,
fashion)
and
artistic
production
can
be

represented
through
photography.



They
will
discuss
the
genres
of
documentary,
urban
landscape,
street
photography,
fashion,
photojournalism,

conceptual
art
and
constructed
photography
in
representing
city
themes.
Informed
by
significant
historical

images,
beginning
with
Henry
Fox
Talbot's
photograph
of
the
construction
of
Trafalgar
Square,
they
will
show
the

development
of
student
work
from
their
summer
school
“Photographing
London”
leading
to
the
most
fascinating

and
revealing
images.
The
teaching
and
learning
experience
has
evidenced
a
structure
to
creative
practice
and

has
resulted
in
a
valuable
and
growing
archive
of
city
based
photography.



Tom
Hunter
will
talk
about
his
own
photographic
practice
and
how
it
responds
to
the
city.
His
work,
which
focuses
on
his
 local
neighbourhood
of
Hackney
in
East
London
covers
topics
including
the
representation
of
marginal
groups, such
as
squatters
and
travellers
within
the
city.
His
work
also
sets
out
to
document
the
changing
face
of
the
inner
city
by
looking
at
council
estates
through
their
architecture,
the
residents
and
their
histories.
He
will
also
be ooking
at
local
businesses,
which
chart
the
different
waves
of
immigration,
which
have
made
such
a
powerful mpact
on
the
history
and
development
on
the
East
End
of
London.
http://www.tomhunter.org



Marco
Bohr
Representing
Tokyo. Marco
Bohr's
presentation
will
focus
on
the
different
approaches
used
by
Japanese
photographers
to
represent the
megapolis
Tokyo.
From
the
student
uprisings
in
the
late
1960s
to
the
post‐recessionary
period
of
the
1990s, the
photographic
representation
of
Tokyo
is
inextricably
linked
to
social,
political
and
ideological
shifts
in
Japanese
society.
Marco's
talk
will
focus
on
how
photographers
utilized
photographic
techniques,
such
as blurriness,
high
key
printing
or
overexposure,
to
create
a
subjective
vision
of
a
dense
urban
landscape.
The varying
impressions
of
Tokyo
project
a
cityscape
that
is
fluid,
evolving
and
multifaceted.
Marco
is
currently completing
his
PhD
on
Japanese
photography
of
the
1990s
at
the
University
of
Westminster.



Rut
Blees
Luxemburg
will
talk
about
her
photographs
which
explore
the
public
spaces
of
the
city,
where
the
ambitions
and unexpected
sensual
elaborations
of
the
‘modern
project’
are
revealed
and
contested.
In
her
photographic
work
she
brings
to
light
the
overlooked,
the
dismissed
and
the
unforeseen
of
the
urban
complex
and
creates immersive
and
vertiginous
compositions
that
challenge
prevailing
representations
of
the
city.
Her
large‐scale photographic
works
expand
the
concept
of
the
common
sensual
in
relation
to
urban
public
space
and

representation.
Rut’s
work
has
been
exhibited
internationally
and
included
in
key
publications
and
exhibitions
on

contemporary
photography
and
art.
Her
monograph
‘Common
sensual’
collects
the
artist’s
work
including
her

collaborative
forays
into
opera,
literature,
architecture
and
urban
culture.
www.rutbleesluxemburg.com  


The event takes place on 18 June
2011
at the University
of
Westminster, 35
Marylebone
Road,
London,
NW1
5LS,
(Opposite
Baker
Street
Tube
Station), London

RPS
Members
and
Students
£15/Non
Members
£20


To book call reception on 01225 325 733 or email reception@rps.org

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