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Representing Conflict Now

Event Details

Representing Conflict Now

Time: June 17, 2017 from 11am to 5pm
Location: IWM London
Street: Lambeth Road
City/Town: London
Website or Map: http://www.iwm.org.uk/events/…
Event Type: all, day, programme, of, events
Organized By: IWM London & London College of Communication
Latest Activity: Jun 7

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Event Description

IWM London is staging a day of installations, performances and debate around our exhibitions Edmund Clark: War of Terror and Sergey Ponomarev: A Lens on Syria, part of  its Syria: A Conflict Explored season.

The day will include:

1. Art, Justice and Terror (charging, ticketed event) – see web link for details)

A programme of talks and panel discussions curated by the London College of Communication in response to IWM London's exhibition Edmund Clark: War on Terror. Artists, photographers, curators, lawyers, eyewitnesses and academics will discuss how art may contribute to informing social attitudes on matters of justice in a time of global conflict in which laws are sometimes absent. 

This is a ticketed, charging event (see web link for details)

2.  How We Respond:  Artists on Conflict (free, drop in event

How is contemporary conflict represented by photographers and other creative artists? What impact does their work have on our understanding of conflict? A chance to join creative artists whose work explore, represent or question our understanding of contemporary conflict for a conversation; to hear their views and to ask questions.  Edmund Clark and Giles Duley are amongst the participants.

See web link for further details

http://www.iwm.org.uk/events/iwm-london/representing-conflict-now-0

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