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Welcome to the British photographic history blog which was launched at the start of 2009. There are now nearly 4100 members, in addition to regular readers. These range from museum and gallery curators, photographic academics, students, collectors, dealers and representatives from the photographic press from around the world. The blog provides a forum for news of events and happenings within the British photographic history community. This can include lectures or meetings, exhibition news, jobs, reviews and general news affecting collections of photographic material or individuals within the field. While the focus is on Britain it may, on occasion, include material that is of wider interest from Europe, the United States, Africa and Asia.

A summary of the previous week's posts is usually emailed to signed up readers each Monday. 

Dr Michael Pritchard

PS. Thanks to George Eastman House (now George Eastman Museum) and History Today magazine blogs for recommending British Photographic History as one of their own favourite blogs. The Daily Telegraph made BPH one of its photography websites of the week

12629995497?profile=RESIZE_400x Tate Modern, London, has given advance notice of a new exhibition Global Pictorialism which will run from 4 December 2025-25 May 2026. It is being developed and researched by the Tate's new photography curator Charmaine Toh.  Discover how pictorialism, the first international art photography movement, developed across the world from the 1880s to the 1960s.

Bringing…

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A Pressphotoman mini-series of blogposts featuring new research about photography in 1860s Eldon Square, Newcastle upon Tyne has just been published.

Part 1 explores how W. & D. Downey came to open a studio at number 9.
Part 2 traces William Softley Parry's photographic journey to number 17.
Part 3 investigates whether their neighbours at number 7, Edward and Eliza Charlton, were skilled 3D photographers.  …

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We call for papers that explore new ways to study magazines and magazine photography as practiced in the United States, 1930-1970. We invite participation from all scholars, writers, curators, archivists, librarians, artists, and independent researchers who use illustrated print culture in the study of American social history.

We seek to loosen categories such as “photojournalism,” “art photography,” “documentary,” “illustration,” or “snapshot,” in favor of broader consideration about…

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12615017252?profile=RESIZE_400x The Bill Douglas Cinema Museum in Exeter has announced the inaugural Stephen Herbert Award, which will enable a researcher to come to the museum to consult the museum's early cinema or optical media holdings. The award is named after the much loved and hugely influential film historian Stephen Herbert, who died last year. The award has been kindly gifted to us in Stephen’s name by his…

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A new blog discusses the University of Cambridge 1897 vote on whether to allow women the titles of their degrees, and looks at the photographs that recorded extraordinary scenes.  The vote (Spoiler alert) went badly against the women and it was not until 1948 that women were finally admitted to full membership of the University. A day and night of riotous celebrations by the male undergraduates followed. Shop windows were broken, a giant bonfire was lit in the Market Square and…

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Presented at the André Malraux Museum of Modern Art – MuMa, the exhibition Photographing in Normandy (1840-1890). A pioneering dialogue between the arts aims to highlight the decisive role that Normandy played in the beginnings of photography. Exhibiting photographs on the occasion of the fifth edition of Normandie Impressionniste and especially for the 150th anniversary of the movement, makes perfect sense, as painting and photography have maintained close links, underpinned by a…

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We are pleased to invite you to the 2-day symposium Vestiges of Memory: Intersections between Photography and Autobiographical Memory held at the University for the Creative Arts in Canterbury on 18 – 19 July. Across two days, this research symposium sets out to explore new ways in which 21st century artists, photographic practitioners and other researchers interrogate, mine, imagine, respond to, question and reflect upon intersections between autobiographical memory…

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Information and discussion on all aspects of British photographic history ranging from news, exhibitions and museum updates, publications, and jobs

 

 

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