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Rick Findler Afghanistan images chosen for In Between Gallery, Brighton

Fabrica gallery, in partnership with Spectrum Photographic, Loupe Magazine and Photo Fringe are pleased to announce that a new photographic image highlighting the current turmoil in Afghanistan by Rick Findler has been chosen for the In Between Gallery. This work will sit in Fabrica’s large window space, which shows contemporary photography in the heart of Brighton’s busy shopping streets for all who pass by, from 20 December 2021 until Spring 2022.

The work is named Lost Connection I Afghanistan and was taken in Afghanistan in Spring 2021. All throughout Bamyan Province (a picturesque mountainous region of Afghanistan 80 miles west of Kabul) thousands of unconnected and unfinished electricity pylons stretch for miles, and have done so for more than two years. The pylons remain standing, unused and unemployed, symbolic of the corruption afflicting the electricity sector, the feeling of an abandoned population and their disillusionment toward the governing authorities. I wondered if you might like to run this work as Rick's best shot? I can share more images from the series if helpful and one plus some more info is included below for now. All the very best, Nicola Award winning photojournalist chosen to have work exhibited in new outdoor exhibition in central Brighton Fabrica gallery, in partnership with Spectrum Photographic, Loupe Magazine and Photo Fringe are pleased to announce that a new photographic image highlighting the current turmoil in Afghanistan by Rick Findler has been chosen for the In Between Gallery.

This work will sit in Fabrica’s large window space, which shows contemporary photography in the heart of Brighton’s busy shopping streets for all who pass by, from 20 December 2021. The work is named Lost Connection I Afghanistan and was taken in Afghanistan in Spring 2021. All throughout Bamyan Province (a picturesque mountainous region of Afghanistan 80 miles west of Kabul) thousands of unconnected and unfinished electricity pylons stretch for miles, and have done so for more than two years. Just 35% of Afghanistan's population has access to electricity, with the electricity sector fraught with tales of corruption. The pylons remain standing, unused and unemployed, symbolic of the corruption afflicting the electricity sector, the feeling of an abandoned population and their disillusionment toward the governing authorities. As the west turns it's back on Afghanistan, it is the people stuck in the middle which are affected the most. They feel abandoned - abandoned by both their government as well as the global powers that once protected them.

These pylons, which once held so much promise for so many people, symbolise a nation forgotten by everyone. An esteemed panel (Liz Whitehead, Fabrica, Claire Wearn, Photo Fringe, Hazel Watts, Spectrum, Cairo Clarke, curator and writer, Luke Archer, Loupe Magazine and Ibrahim Azab, artist and curator) unanimously decided on Findler as the overall winner of a recent call out for a work for the space. The image will be displayed from 20 December 2021 to April 2022.

This image is one of seven from the series and has not been displayed to the public before now, giving Brighton audiences the first chance to see this work.

Liz Whitehead, Director, Fabrica, said, “As the host of the In Between Gallery the opportunity it affords is to put photography onto the street at Christmas. This photograph keeps Afghanistan in the public imagination”

Claire Wearn, Director, Photo Fringe said, “Photo Fringe aims to develop new ways of seeing together. Rick's powerful photo challenges typical imagery of Afghanistan and gives a haunting insight into current conditions in need of global attention. Luke Archer, of Loupe Magazine said, “Rick’s image stands apart from the rolling news coverage of Afghanistan. Instead his carefully composed landscape encapsulates the enormity and complexity of the issues that have plagued Afghanistan’s recent history. It is an image that needs to be shown 

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